Giovedì 17 Gennaio 2019 | 18:27

NEWS DALLA SEZIONE

Imola
M5S votes League motion to remove Arabic hospital signs

M5S votes League motion to remove Arabic hospital signs

 
Milan
Soccer: Inter ultra leader nabbed for Napoli clashes

Soccer: Inter ultra leader nabbed for Napoli clashes

 
Naples
From Canova to Magna Graecia at Naples' MANN

From Canova to Magna Graecia at Naples' MANN

 
Rome
Bond spread dips under 250 points

Bond spread dips under 250 points

 
Genoa
Man nabbed for shooting at neighbours

Man nabbed for shooting at neighbours

 
Rome
Rome to present new plan for historic architecture

Rome to present new plan for historic architecture

 
Rome
Exports down 0.4% in Nov on Oct - ISTAT

Exports down 0.4% in Nov on Oct - ISTAT

 
Savona
12 nabbed for importing stolen cars from Lithuania

12 nabbed for importing stolen cars from Lithuania

 
Venice
Man, 25, nabbed for robbing boy, 16

Man, 25, nabbed for robbing boy, 16

 
Man feels ill and dies falling off balcony

Man feels ill and dies falling off balcony

 
Rome
10 nabbed as drug pusher gang smashed near Rimini

10 nabbed as drug pusher gang smashed near Rimini

 

Trieste

Proteins found that help tumours grow in cancer sufferers

Scientists hope discovery could lead to better cancer treatment

Proteins found that help tumours grow in cancer sufferers

(ANSA)- Trieste, January 15 - Two proteins which work together in the bodies of cancer sufferers to help tumours grow have been discovered, Italian researchers said Friday. The discovery of the mutated p53 and Yap proteins, and how they work together to push tumours to grow, could lead to better treatments to help combat the disease. In healthy individuals, the p53 protein is considered one of the most powerful antidotes to developing tumours, preventing the growth of mutated cells. However, scientists from the Regina Elena National Tumour Institute in Rome, along with researchers from Trieste University and the Cib National Laboratory in Trieste, discovered that the protein behaves differently once a tumour has established itself. Often, it mutates and combines with the yap protein to become a dangerous force within the body. Giovanni Blandino, a coordinator at the Regina Elena Institute, said: "It's now possible that we might be able to break the link between the Yap and the mutant p53 proteins in tumours using specific strategies. "Yap is not essential to normal tissues in the adult body, while the mutated p53 protein is only present in diseased tissue. "We therefore have a high possibility of success."

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