Domenica 20 Gennaio 2019 | 22:10

NEWS DALLA SEZIONE

Vicenza
Migrant hired after handing in wallet with 900 euros

Migrant hired after handing in wallet with 900 euros

 
Rome
7 of 10 gynecologists conscientious objectors agst abortion

7 of 10 gynecologists conscientious objectors agst abortion

 
Norcia
Cloistered nuns return to quake zone, in container

Cloistered nuns return to quake zone, in container

 
Rome
Calenda launches pro-EU list

Calenda launches pro-EU list

 
Milan
Carige asks State guarantee for 2 bn in bonds

Carige asks State guarantee for 2 bn in bonds

 
Rome
Treccani adds Sordi to Italian biographical dictionary

Treccani adds Sordi to Italian biographical dictionary

 
Berlin
Italy shd work to defend EU, Schaeuble to Mattarella

Italy shd work to defend EU, Schaeuble to Mattarella

 
Rome
Soccer: Koulibaly appeal agst 2-match ban turned down

Soccer: Koulibaly appeal agst 2-match ban turned down

 
Rome
Society splits if wealth not shared - pope

Society splits if wealth not shared - pope

 
Brescia
Woman's charred body found in wood near Brescia

Woman's charred body found in wood near Brescia

 
Berlin
Merkel lauds Italy Libya line

Merkel lauds Italy Libya line

 

Rome

Four rescued banks 'solid', the guilty must pay says Renzi

Premier promises 'maximum transparency'

Four rescued banks 'solid', the guilty must pay says Renzi

Rome, January 12 - Premier Matteo Renzi said Tuesday that four failed banks are now back on their feet thanks to a government-brokered bailout, and that whoever is guilty for defrauding small savers must pay. "The four banks are now solid because (the government's) decree had a big impact on secondary shareholders, who add up to a couple hundred people," Renzi told La Repubblica daily's Repubblica TV. "I want whoever erred to pay - there will be maximum transparency, thanks also to (anti-corruption czar Raffaele Cantone," the premier said. Renzi's remarks addressed the November rescue of Banca Etruria, Banca delle Marche, Cassa di Risparmio della Provincia di Chieti (CariChieti) and Cassa di Risparmio di Ferrara (CariFe) banks. The 3.6-billion-euro government-decreed rescue, financed by healthy Italian banks, saved jobs and protected account holders, but shares and bonds in the four lenders are now worthless. One of Banca Etruria's former bondholders, Luigi d'Angelo, committed suicide after his life savings became worthless. The small investors whose savings went up in smoke are seeking government compensation. The government is setting up a 100-million-euro fund, which may be increased, to compensate investors who can prove they were duped by the banks into buying risky subordinated bonds.

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